Is “Boring-Shaming” the new Slut Shaming?

Is “Boring-Shaming” the new Slut Shaming?

I have been “boring-shamed” in my life. I’ve been accused of being a boring person. I don’t go out and drink until I vomit, I don’t sleep around with a new Tinder-partner every week, I don’t have a clue who won the season finale on “insert reality program here” and you won’t find me at the neighbourhood weekend party. In other words, I must be supremely boring. Ever since I was a kid, partying, drinking and other similar activities had little to no appeal to me. I didn’t view partaking in such activities as positive. Still, I had an underlying sense of there being something wrong with me due to my lack of desire for such things. Society at large had impressed upon me its values putting degeneracy on a pedestal.

Instead of splurging money on a six-pack of some cheap beer, getting a STD test after a careless weekend or recovering from a headache after having my ears bombarded with loud music at a party, I have found different outlets for my human energy. I’ve explored countless topics and fictional worlds through a tremendous amount of books I’ve read over the years. I have listened to thousands upon thousands of hours of political discussions on podcasts. Further, I’ve enjoyed the tremendous natural beauty in the woods surrounding my residence. In my eyes, I haven’t wasted any time (other than on some mediocre TV-series from time to time) on useless activities, and I have a treasure trove of memories of partaking in wholesome activities.

From my perspective, I’m not boring at all. I’m engaged with the world around me and with the world at large. I’ve deliberately chosen to focus my energies on topics that actually matter, the US presidential election last year for instance, over numbing drivel on some random TV-channel. The dominant culture in my country however would disagree. Socially, my choice of activities haven’t given me any social capital. It hasn’t opened any doors or been useful in making interpersonal contact. That being said, I wouldn’t change my choices if I had the chance (there are other things in my life I would have changed, but not the topics I’ve focused on).

I recently listened to a discussion on Tara McCarthy’s YouTube channel about r/K selection theory. It got me thinking about this topic. “Boring-shaming” could be interpreted through this lens as being an attack upon the “K” gene set by the “r” gene set. My choices about which activities to partake in so far in life fall comfortably within the label “K” activities. The promotion of low investment pair bonding (tinder dates, sleeping around) and alcohol fuelled binges (consuming excess resources, another “r” trait) certainly fit into the mould of what one would expect “r” people to enjoy.

If we accept that feminism as it is currently promoted in the West is a solid “r” phenomenon, then a lot of jigsaw pieces are falling into place. Tara and others who have discussed r/K are correct in their analysis of its relevance to society. There is a societal death-struggle between the two gene sets, and “r” is unfortunately winning. The promotion of uncontrolled immigration, overly generous welfare policies and similar policies suddenly become much clearer when viewed through the lens of r/K. The term “slut-shaming” would most commonly be associated with feminists. It is weaponized persuasion to further the agenda of the “r” gene set. Perhaps it is time for traditional, “K” values to fight back with the same coin? How would the “r” rabbits respond to being labelled “boring-shamers”?

 

 

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